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Genocide, resolution and wooden lawyers

After last year's elections in Montenegro, it seemed that the new government would lead it in a direction that would be at least acceptable to the current Serbian authorities, but it turned out that things are not so simple and black and white. Montenegro has apparently moved far enough from everything that plagued it during the dark 90s that there can be no turning back.

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Photo: Reuters
Photo: Reuters
Disclaimer: The translations are mostly done through AI translator and might not be 100% accurate.

What exactly is the problem - more precisely, the problem of Serbia - with the Resolution on the genocide in Srebrenica, which was passed by the Parliament of Montenegro? Where did the general political mobilization, media hysteria, threats of ostracism, outpourings of verbal cowboyism come from?

There is, and cannot be, anything new and unheard of in the Resolution itself, anything that has not been legally decided long ago and that is not an elementary historical truth. Also, there is nothing in it that in any way condemns the Republic of Serbia and its citizens, and of course not the "Serbian people" referred to again and again by the numerous wooden lawyers.

In fact, there is nothing in that Resolution significantly different from what it is The Serbian Parliament adopted it in 2010, except that this one, for tactical and calculative reasons, avoided direct mention of that terrible word "genocide". Doing so makes a concession to those who can't bring themselves to know that the word "genocide" is not terrible, but it is terrible - genocide. No matter when, no matter where, against whomever it was committed.

The reasons and motives for encouraging such an atmosphere are at least twofold. On the one hand, it is about an attempt to support and consolidate those political forces in Montenegro who are at will - without euphemisms: who are political clients - of Aleksandar Vučić and his political environment.

After last year's elections in Montenegro, it seemed that the new government would lead Montenegro in a direction that would be at least acceptable to the current Serbian authorities, but it turned out that things are not so simple and black and white: in the years of its emancipation from the fantasies of "Serbian to the world", Montenegro has obviously moved far enough from everything that plagued it during the dark nineties that there can be no going back, because there will always be a civil and political majority that will prevent it. Hence the impossibility of remaining in the position of the recent Minister of Justice, hence ultimately this Resolution.

Those in Montenegro who tried to stop it remained in the minority, regardless of frenetic support from Belgrade. All that is left for Vučić's nomenclature is to compromise both himself and the country he represents with threats such as "those who voted for the Resolution should be banned from entering Serbia", and with epic cries that they have thereby "written themselves out of Serbia", whatever that means. whatever, and wherever enrollment in that institution was otherwise done.

On the other hand, political life in Montenegro is also an expression of frustration because of what it is, obviously, considered to be by a final judgment against Ratko Mladić definitely rejected any possibility of accepting as valid anywhere, anytime and in any way the narrative not only about Srebrenica, but also about the war in Bonn and Herzegovina, and about the post-Yugoslav wars in general, which are always represented and defended by those who during the war In the nineties, they were in power in Belgrade.

Didn't Milošević, Karadžić, Mladić and others talk about this (in vain) while defending themselves before the Tribunal in The Hague? Isn't that what the current Serbian government is talking about, at the top of which - from Vučić and Dačić onwards - the same people who were ministers, spokespersons and everything else that could be in that machinery in the nineties?

It goes without saying that the perpetrators and their former (?) political patrons and allies could not maintain control over the political, legal, historical and moral narrative of Srebrenica anywhere outside of Serbia and the fragile chimera of the "Serbian world".

This, one can believe, is also clear to them. However, they still have to stubbornly adhere to it because the defense and endless repetition of that narrative is actually the same as the "defense of the territory", not the state, but the territory where their rule is possible and real. Without that, she would be irretrievably compromised and thereby delegitimized.

But, since it cannot and must not be said that way, an appropriate orchestra is hired for slander and curses, whose task is to "defend the Serbian people" from the "accusation of being genocidal". Such an accusation, of course, does not exist, has not existed and will not exist, at the expense of any "people". It's just that it's a secret that is being kept from that same "people" by all means of obscenity rhetoric...

And if someone still wonders what the majority of Montenegro - both for and against the recent government - "escaped", then here is the answer: from that very thing. Just from that political, historical and moral impasse.

It seemed, admittedly, that Serbia also moved away from that dark and musty place, but returned to it submissively as the victim returns to the abuser. The amount of the bill for this is unknown because the bill is still increasing.

(Radio Free Europe)

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