Nails reveal what ails you

Nails reflect the health of the whole organism. Even the smallest change on them can be an alarm that something is happening
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nails, manicure, Photo: Shutterstock
nails, manicure, Photo: Shutterstock
Disclaimer: The translations are mostly done through AI translator and might not be 100% accurate.
Ažurirano: 29.03.2018. 13:14h

If you want to know the state of your body - simply look at your nails. Their color and shape say a lot about your health. Think about it.

Hands say a lot about character, say psychologists. Their appearance and what you do with them reveals whether you are nervous, anxious, relaxed...

And did you know that nails also reflect the state of health?

Nails - well, it probably didn't occur to you that they are an indicator of health. Pay attention, because in general - in healthy people, nails are pink, firm and smooth. Every white spot or cracked nail is not a sign of alarm.

Nails reflect the health of the whole organism. Even the smallest change on them can be an alarm that something is happening.

Here are some of the changes to look out for:

If we have a lack of a lunula, a whitish crescent or an imprint on the nail, it is certain that we suffer from anemia. If streaks or white spots appear, it means that we lack minerals, such as zinc or magnesium. When the patient brings two nails together, and they cannot touch, but their tips diverge, this is a sign of cardiovascular disease. Brittle, brittle nails indicate problems with the thyroid gland. If you notice tiny holes on your nails arranged in the shape of a cluster, the so-called pitting, there is a risk that you have psoriasis. It also happens that the nail darkens out of the blue, which can be a sign of melanoma of the nail. Thick yellow nails that grow slowly can indicate respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis. Cracks and furrows can indicate diabetes. Nails that bend outwards can be a sign of low iron levels in the blood. So, if your nails don't look healthy at first glance, be sure to see a doctor, reports Nezavisne.

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