One of the causes of Crohn's disease discovered

"If it is a simple enzyme responsible for the imbalance, it is possible to neutralize it. Our idea would be to recreate the microbiome system without the bacteria carrying the enzyme urease, responsible for the imbalance in the intestinal flora, which we call dysbiosis."
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stomach pain, Photo: Shutterstock
stomach pain, Photo: Shutterstock
Disclaimer: The translations are mostly done through AI translator and might not be 100% accurate.
Ažurirano: 20.11.2017. 11:14h

An imbalance of the microbiome in the intestinal flora could be one of the causes of Crohn's disease - a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that can affect any part of the digestive tract. Most often, it is the back part of the small intestine, or the large intestine.

The human body contains 90 percent of bacteria organized into communities that we call microbiomes. A rich and diverse set of bacteria, fungi and viruses that live in the human body and are ten times more numerous than human cells, and function as an invisible organ, is called the microbiome.

It is extremely important for the intestines because it was previously suspected that the imbalance of the microbiome affects the development of numerous non-infectious chronic conditions and diseases, obesity, depression, autism, allergies, and in most cases diseases related to the digestive tract.

The microbiome protects against the invasion of pathogenic microorganisms, stimulates the immune response, the production of antimicrobial factors, participates in digestive and respiratory functions, and promotes the function of protecting the skin and mucous membranes.

"The findings of American scientists suggest that by removing part of the microbiome from the intestinal tract and reintroducing a certain type of 'good' bacteria without the enzyme urease, it could effectively fight Crohn's disease," says Gary Wu, deputy director of the department of gastroenterology research at the University of Medicine. in Pennsylvania and lead author of the study.

"If it is a simple enzyme responsible for the imbalance, it is possible to neutralize it. Our idea would be to recreate a microbiome system without bacteria carrying the enzyme urease, responsible for the imbalance in the intestinal flora, which we call dysbiosis," explained Dr. Wu.

An imbalance of intestinal flora can be caused by inflammation, antibiotics or unhealthy eating habits. Dysbiosis of the intestinal flora is considered the most responsible for the development of Crohn's disease, but scientists have not yet officially confirmed this.

Multiple studies in mice and humans have shown that the type of "bad" bacteria that feed on urea, the toxic nitrogenous waste found in the large intestine, plays a significant role in the development of dysbiosis.

The intake of "good" bacteria could contribute to a healthy balance of intestinal flora and represent a potentially successful therapy in the fight against Crohn's disease.

Almost a million adults and children suffer from it in the US alone.

The research was published in the journal "Science of Translational Medicine", reports Jutarnji.

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