O'Flaherty: The world will not look away from the denial of the genocide in Srebrenica

"Widespread denial of genocide and glorification of war criminals in the territory of the former Yugoslavia threaten the rule of law, peace and social cohesion," said the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe.

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Photo: Council of Europe
Photo: Council of Europe
Disclaimer: The translations are mostly done through AI translator and might not be 100% accurate.

The Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe, Michael O'Flaherty, said that the denial of genocide and the glorification of war criminals threaten the rule of law, peace and social cohesion in the territory of the former Yugoslavia, but that the adoption of the Resolution on the establishment of the International Day of Remembrance of the Genocide in Srebrenica is a signal that the world will not look away.

"The decision of the UN General Assembly to declare July 11 as the International Day of Remembrance of the Genocide in Srebrenica in 1995 signals that the world will not look away in the face of denial. It will stand up for the human rights of victims and survivors.

International courts found that genocide was committed in Srebrenica in 1995. Widespread denial of genocide and glorification of war criminals in the territory of the former Yugoslavia threaten the rule of law, peace and social cohesion.

I call on the Council of Europe and its member states to mark July 11 every year as the International Day of Remembrance of the Genocide in Srebrenica in 1995," O'Flaherty wrote on social network X (Twitter).

O'Flaherty was elected Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe in January, having previously served as Director of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, Professor of Human Rights and Director of the Irish National University Centre, Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and a member of the Human Rights Committee. rights of the United Nations

The function of the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights was established in 1999 and represents, as determined then, "a non-judicial, independent and impartial institution for promoting awareness of human rights and their respect in the 46 member states of the Council of Europe", whose headquarters are in Strasbourg.

The Commissioner regularly visits member countries and talks with governments and representatives of civil society on issues related to his mandate.

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